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BIOEE 4760 : Biology of Fishes, Lectures
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Introduction to the systematic study of fossil and living fishes: their anatomy, physiology and functional morphology, behavior, ecology, diversity, evolution, classification, and identification. Emphasizes marine fishes from different habitats (temperate, tropical coral reef, intertidal, and deep sea), local freshwater species, and interesting freshwater fishes from around the world, especially South America, Africa and Australia.
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BIOEE 4690 : Food, Agriculture, and Society
Crosslisted as: BSOC 4691, STS 4691 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Multidisciplinary course dealing with the social and environmental impact of food production in the United States and developing countries. Agroecosystems of various kinds are analyzed from biological, economic, and social perspectives. The impacts of traditional, conventional, and alternative agricultural technologies are critically examined in the context of developed and developing economies. Specific topics include biodiversity and ecosystem services in agriculture, transgenic crops, biofuels, urban agriculture, and sustainable development.
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BIOEE 4620 : Marine Ecosystem Sustainability
Crosslisted as: EAS 4620, EAS 5620 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Lectures and discussion focus on current research in marine ecosystems with an emphasis on processes unique to marine systems and current issues of ocean sustainability. A synthetic treatment of multiple levels of organization in the ocean including organismal, population, community, and ecosystems. Examples are drawn from all types of marine habitats, including polar seas, temperate coastal waters, and tropical coral reefs.
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BIOEE 4550 : Insect Ecology
Crosslisted as: ENTOM 4550 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The ecology of insects and their role in natural and agricultural systems. Emphasis is on basic principles in population and community ecology and plant-insect interactions with readings from the current ecological and entomological literature. Laboratory includes outdoor field trips and a research project to learn common approaches in ecology.
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BIOEE 3780 : Computerized Tomography of Vertebrates
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course is an introduction to CT visualization for its applications in comparative biology of the vertebrates. Students will learn and practice the exploration of vertebrate anatomy with OSIRIX 3-D visualization software or its future replacement; work on student-designed projects and/or a large survey of the vertebrates based on CT scans from specimens in the Cornell museum as well as the Smithsonian and other museums around the world.            
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BIOEE 3611 : Field Ecology
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Katie Sirianni
Exercises designed to give students direct experience with field research to address ecological hypotheses, with emphasis on developing observational skills and basic methods in population and community ecology. Topics include methods in plant succession, niche relationships, influence of herbivores and competitors on plant communities, aquatic food web analysis, use of scientific collections, and presenting research results in written and oral form. We will visit a diversity of habitats and natural areas in Central New York.  Students will conduct an independent research project and present their findings.
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BIOEE 3610 : Advanced Ecology
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course provides an in depth survey of ecology emphasizing conceptual foundations and the integration of experimental and quantitative approaches, including population and community ecology, ecosystem biology, and ecological modeling. Current and classical ecological research is used to introduce major concepts and methods, derive major ecological principles, and critically discuss their applicability on multiple organizational levels, on multiple scales, and in a variety of ecosystems. Weekly discussion/lab sections focus on measurement techniques and computation (modeling, simulation and data analysis using the R language).
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BIOEE 3340 : Tropical Field Entomology I
Crosslisted as: ENTOM 3340 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Bryan Danforth
This course will give students hands-on exposure to insect biodiversity, ecology, and behavior in a neotropical rainforest environment. Students will gain experience in insect sampling and survey methods, insect identification to the family level, insect natural history, experimental design and data collection in a field setting, basic statistics, interpretation and evaluation of scientific literature, and scientific writing. Course takes place over a two-week period for approximately 8 hr/day.
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BIOEE 2640 : Tropical Field Ornithology
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Provides students with the opportunity to study birds intensively in a neotropical environment. Students learn observational and field techniques, formulate and participate in group research projects.
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BIOEE 2525 : Ecology and Conservation of Wildlife in the Neotropics
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This on-campus and international field course combination provides participating students with a broad introduction to the research process in field ecology, with literature and hands-on examples drawn from the fauna and flora of coastal Patagonia (Argentina), an area that provides us with unprecedented access to both marine and terrestrial wildlife as well as exposure to conservation challenges and success stories. The course begins in the latter part of the Fall semester when it meets twice weekly for seven weeks, largely to discuss relevant papers from the scientific literature with an emphasis on best practices in designing field studies to address questions in Neotropical ecology, behavioral ecology, conservation, and evolutionary biology. During the 2+ week field component in January, students travel among field sites in Patagonia and put this knowledge to work in an experiential context by designing and implementing a series of research projects, including numerous short 'blitz' projects and several longer, more intensive independent projects; many of these field studies involve close-hand observations of marine mammals, penguins, or other seabirds. The 7-week Spring semester component is focused on building skills in data analysis and scientific writing, based on the data collected in the field by each student.
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