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BIOEE 4661 : Physiological Ecology, Laboratory
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Detailed survey of the physiological approaches used in understanding the relationships between organisms and their environment with a focus on plants and vertebrate animals. Laboratories apply physiological techniques to specific ecological problems and cover aspects of experimental design and computer-aided data analysis.
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BIOEE 4660 : Physiological Ecology, Lectures
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Detailed survey of the physiological approaches used to understand the relationships between organisms (plants and animals) and their environment. Lectures explore physiological adaptation; limiting factors; resource acquisition and allocation; photosynthesis, carbon, and energy balance; water use and water relations; nutrient relations; linking physiology, development, and morphology; stress physiology; life history and physiology; the evolution of physiological performance; and physiology at the population, community, and ecosystem levels. Readings draw from the primary literature and textbooks.
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BIOEE 4461 : Plant Behavior and Biotic Interactions, Laboratory
Crosslisted as: BIONB 4461, PLSCI 4461 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Laboratory course covering topics presented in BIOEE 4460/BIONB 4460/PLSCI 4460.
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BIOEE 4460 : Plant Behavior and Biotic Interactions, Lecture
Crosslisted as: BIONB 4460, PLSCI 4460 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
How do plants respond to antagonists, such as herbivores and pathogens? What are the checks and balances that keep mutualist organisms in their tight interactions? How are symbioses organized on molecular, metabolic and ecological levels? What are the molecular, plant hormonal, and metabolic mechanisms mediating plant biotic interactions with other organisms? What ecological and evolutionary consequences do these interactions have for the fitness of the plants and their interactors? This course provides an overview of plants' myriad interactions with antagonists and mutualists, from microbes to multicellular organisms, and explains the underlying ecological and evolutionary concepts. It gives an introduction to the study of induced plant responses in the light of a behavioral biology framework.            
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BIOEE 3780 : Computerized Tomography of Vertebrates
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course is an introduction to CT visualization for its applications in comparative biology of the vertebrates. Students will learn and practice the exploration of vertebrate anatomy with OSIRIX 3-D visualization software or its future replacement; work on student-designed projects and/or a large survey of the vertebrates based on CT scans from specimens in the Cornell museum as well as the Smithsonian and other museums around the world.            
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BIOEE 3690 : Chemical Ecology
Crosslisted as: BIONB 3690, ENTOM 3690 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Why are chilies so spicy? This course examines the chemical basis of interactions between species and is intended for students with a basic knowledge of chemistry and biology. Focuses on the ecology and chemistry of plants, animals, and microbes. Stresses chemical signals used in diverse ecosystems, using Darwinian natural selection as a framework. Topics include plant defenses, microbial warfare, communication in marine organisms, and human pheromones.
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BIOEE 3510 : Conservation Oceanography
Crosslisted as: EAS 3510 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Focuses on field methods used to study marine organisms and ecosystems in efforts to sustain them in the face of many environmental challenges. Introduces students to modern techniques of marine-ecosystems research, including bioacoustics, ecological survey methods, and experimental marine ecology. This course is field and laboratory intensive with students engaged in hands-on, active learning that takes advantage of local resources.
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BIOEE 2740 : The Vertebrates: Comparative Anatomy, Function, and Evolution
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Introductory course in vertebrate organismal biology that explores the anatomy and function of vertebrates with an emphasis on trends in vertebrate evolution. Lectures cover topics such as the origin, anatomy, physiology, and evolution of various vertebrate groups, with a focus on organ systems (such as the nervous, circulatory, and respiratory systems), life history, locomotion, behavior, and conservation.  This course prepares students for advanced courses on the biology of fishes, amphibians and reptiles, birds, and mammals; pre-vet and pre-med students benefit from its comparative anatomical approach to understanding the organization of the vertebrate body.
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BIOEE 2641 : Analysis and Interpretation of Bird Observations
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Provides students with the opportunity to study birds intensively in a neotropical environment. Students learn observational and field techniques, formulate and participate in group research projects.
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BIOEE 2526 : Neotropical Wildlife Biology
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Leonardo Campagna
This on-campus and international field course combination provides participating students with a broad introduction to the research process in field ecology, with literature and hands-on examples drawn from the fauna and flora of coastal Patagonia (Argentina), an area that provides us with unprecedented access to both marine and terrestrial wildlife as well as exposure to conservation challenges and success stories. The course begins in the latter part of the Fall semester when it meets twice weekly for seven weeks, largely to discuss relevant papers from the scientific literature with an emphasis on best practices in designing field studies to address questions in Neotropical ecology, behavioral ecology, conservation, and evolutionary biology. During the 2+ week field component in January, students travel among field sites in Patagonia and put this knowledge to work in an experiential context by designing and implementing a series of research projects, including numerous short 'blitz' projects and several longer, more intensive independent projects; many of these field studies involve close-hand observations of marine mammals, penguins, or other seabirds. The 7-week Spring semester component is focused on building skills in data analysis and scientific writing, based on the data collected in the field by each student.
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